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Saved replies keyboard shortcuts

For almost two years you’ve been able to use saved replies to quickly respond to multiple issues and pull requests. Now saved replies have keyboard shortcuts to make them even easier to use.

Saved reply keyboard shortcuts

To activate your saved replies press Ctrl . when composing or replying to an issue or pull request. Select the saved reply of your choice with a number, for example Ctrl 2.

Note if your saved reply ends with a # or @ after inserting the saved reply it will attempt to autocomplete an issue or pull request number or username. Check out the documentation to learn more.

Use any theme with GitHub Pages

Just over a year ago Jekyll, the open source project that powers GitHub Pages, introduced shared themes. Since then, you’ve been able to use about a dozen themes to change the look and feel of your GitHub Pages site.

Starting today, you can use any of the hundreds of community-curated themes on To build your site with any public, GitHub-hosted theme, add the following to your site’s _config.yml file:

remote_theme: owner/name

Replacing owner and name with the repository’s owner and name.

And if you’re interested in making your Jekyll theme available to other users, simply follow the instructions for creating a Gem-based theme, and ensure the repository is public.

For more information, see the Jekyll theme documentation or get in touch.

Introducing team discussions

Working together on software is so much more than writing code. Processes like planning, analysis, design, user research, documentation, and general project decision-making all play a part in the build process. Now there’s a new way to talk through projects with your team.

Demo of team discussions

Give every conversation a home (and a URL)

Team discussions provide your team and organization members a place to share information with each other. Gone are the days of having your issues cluttered with discussions or your pull requests flooded with lengthy conversations that aren’t related to your code changes. Team discussions give those conversations a home and a URL on GitHub, so they can be shared easily across the platform or saved to reference later.

Start discussions from your dashboard

To get started with team discussions, navigate to your dashboard while logged in and choose a team from the new “Your teams” section on the right sidebar. Then click on your team to go to the discussion view. From there you can start a new discussion or join in on an existing one.

Chat with your team in public or private

All organization members can see your discussion posts by default. Mark your post as private if you have something more sensitive to share. Only direct team members will have access to the private post and its replies.

Screenshot of a private post

Building on top of the nested teams functionality, notifications cascade from parent to children teams making it even easier to share important information throughout your organization.

Screenshot of team discussions

Get updates on conversations you care about

Having trouble staying in the know about what other teams within your organization are working on? Watch a team that you’re not a member of to stay up to date on their public discussion activity. If you’re worried about getting too many notifications, that’s okay, too! You can always subscribe or unsubscribe to individual posts or decide to un-watch an entire team if the flow of information is too much.

Screenshot of team discussions view

Support for team discussions in the GitHub API v3 and v4 and GitHub Enterprise is coming soon—and stay tuned for even more features, and functionality. Our goal is to provide you with a place to organize your thoughts, discuss ideas, and work through your team’s toughest problems on GitHub.

To learn more, check out the documentation!

Introducing security alerts on GitHub

Last month, we made it easier for you to keep track of the projects your code depends on with the dependency graph, currently supported in Javascript and Ruby. Today, for the over 75 percent of GitHub projects that have dependencies, we’re helping you do more than see those important projects. With your dependency graph enabled, we’ll now notify you when we detect a vulnerability in one of your dependencies and suggest known fixes from the GitHub community.

Security Alerts & Suggested Fix

How to start using security alerts

Whether your projects are private or public, security alerts get vital vulnerability information to the right people on your team.

Enable your dependency graph

Public repositories will automatically have your dependency graph and security alerts enabled. For private repositories, you’ll need to opt in to security alerts in your repository settings or by allowing access in the Dependency graph section of your repository’s Insights tab.

Set notification preferences

When your dependency graph is enabled, admins will receive security alerts by default. Admins can also add teams or individuals as recipients for security alerts in the dependency graph settings.

Respond to alerts

When we notify you about a potential vulnerability, we’ll highlight any dependencies that we recommend updating. If a known safe version exists, we’ll select one using machine learning and publicly available data, and include it in our suggestion.

Vulnerability coverage

Vulnerabilities that have CVE IDs (publicly disclosed vulnerabilities from the National Vulnerability Database) will be included in security alerts. However, not all vulnerabilities have CVE IDs—even many publicly disclosed vulnerabilities don’t have them. We’ll continue to get better at identifying vulnerabilities as our security data grows. For more help managing security issues, check out our security partners in the GitHub Marketplace.

This is the next step in using the world’s largest collection of open source data to help you keep code safer and do your best work. The dependency graph and security alerts currently support Javascript and Ruby—with Python support coming in 2018.

Learn more about security alerts

A more connected universe

universe october 11-12

Almost a decade ago, GitHub was created as a place for developers to work together on code. Now, millions of people around the world use our platform to build businesses, learn from each other, and create tools we’ll use for decades to come. Together, you’ve shown that some of the most inventive, impactful things happen when curious and creative people have a space to work together.

Today, at GitHub Universe, we shared plans to build on our ten years of experience and 1.5 billion commits. We’ve taken the first step toward using the world’s largest collection of open source data to improve the way we collaborate with these new experiences.

Watch GitHub Universe

Protect code with your dependency graph and security alerts

There are millions of open source projects on GitHub. If you build software, your code likely depends on at least one of those projects. Now, our data can help you manage increasingly complex dependencies and keep your code safer as you work on connected projects—even for private repositories.

Dependency graph

The new dependency graph gives you insight into the projects your code depends on and projects that depend on your code. Now you can see all of the packages and applications you’re connected to, without leaving your repository. Your graph currently supports Ruby and JavaScript, and Python support is on the way!

Learn more about your dependency graph

Security alerts (coming soon)

Soon, your dependency graph will be able to track when dependencies are associated with public security vulnerabilities. We’ll notify people who have access when we detect a vulnerability, and in some cases, suggest a known security fix from the GitHub community.

Security alerts are the first in what we hope will be a robust collection of tools to keep your code safe, and we need people who build on our APIs to help us make them even better—and to keep security data current for the community. We can’t wait to see what you can do!


Discover new projects with news feed and Explore

With more than 25 million active repositories on GitHub, there are new ways to get involved in projects and communities every day. We have two improved experiences that will help you find the ones you’re interested in.

News feed

Your updated news feed connects you with opportunities to explore and expand your corner of GitHub like never before.

Behind the new “Discover repositories” feed on your dashboard, you’ll see recommendations for open source projects to explore. These recommendations are tailored to you based on people you follow, repositories you star, and what’s popular on GitHub.

You’re in control of the recommendations you see: Want to contribute to more Python projects? Star projects like Django or pandas, follow their maintainers, and you’ll find similar projects in your feed. You can also dismiss any updates you’re not interested in, and you’ll see less like those in the future. The “Browse activity” feed in your dashboard will continue to bring you the latest updates directly from repositories you watch and people you follow.


Discover new projects


We’ve completely redesigned the Explore experience to connect you with curated collections, topics, and resources from GitHub contributors around the world.

Collections are hand-picked resources from the GitHub universe and beyond. Browse collections to learn about ideas that interest you, like machine learning or game development, and find repositories and organizations that help you dig deeper.

Topic pages help you find projects related to technologies, languages, frameworks, or platforms—thanks to the GitHub community’s topic tags. Use topic pages to find all Android or CSS projects for example, and suggest edits to topic pages in our public repository.


Start exploring

Other ways to connect

We’re also introducing Premium Support for GitHub Enterprise, and we’ll be introducing a new Community Forum, Marketplace trial program, and team discussion tool soon.

See what else is new

This is just the beginning

These experiences are a first step in using insights to complement your workflow, but there’s so much more to come. With a little help from GitHub data, we hope to help you find work you’re interested in, write better code, fix bugs faster, and make your GitHub experience totally unique to you.

We can’t wait to get building, and more importantly, see what you build when you have all of the right tools and people behind you.

Today’s launches wouldn’t be possible without all of your work on open source projects over the last decade. The future of GitHub is in the hundreds of millions of commits you’ve already made. Thanks for everything you’ve contributed so far.

Want to see all of the work you’ve been a part of? See our community’s year in data:

Explore Octoverse



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