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The most popular courses on GitHub

Thousands of teachers use GitHub to host their courses, distribute assignments, and get insight into student progress. Many teachers open source their materials, so other teachers can use them. Between Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and custom lessons from individual teachers, there’s plenty of materials for new teachers to adapt and reuse in their classrooms.

After seeing the growth of educational repositories on GitHub, we put together a list of some of the most popular courses. Courses were selected based on forks (repository copies) and stars (bookmarks that indicate interest). You’ll also find documentation for each of the repositories to guide you through the course materials.

If we missed a course, or if you’d like yours included in a more extensive list, let us know in the GitHub Education Community.

Top courses based on stars

1. Ada Developers Academy’s Jump Start Curriculum (223 stars)

ADA’s Jump Start Curriculum helps prospective students become familiar with the tools, concepts, and vocabulary they’ll need to be successful in the larger program. Each lesson begins with stating learning goals, so students can be sure they’re retaining what they need to prior to entering the program.

2. React From Zero (207 stars)

React From Zero is a straightforward introduction to React that is broken into 17 parts. Each part of the tutorial is in the code for that lesson, using comments to explain concepts in React and examples right in the editor. Each lesson also links to a preview of how the code renders in a browser, so you can follow along and immediately see the outcome of code while you’re learning.

3. Hear Me Code’s Python Lessons (199 stars)

Hear Me Code, based in Washington, D.C., is an organization that offers free, beginner-friendly classes to women. This repository has a “Start Here” guide for those who’ve never installed or run Python before. The lessons are broken into 16 sections, each covering a different concept. Hear Me Code’s slides are also hosted on GitHub, so it’s easy for you to follow this curriculum on your own.

4. Ada Developers Academy’s Textbook Curriculum (154 stars)

Ada Developers Academy is a tuition-free program for women and gender-diverse people to learn software development. Their first repository on this list is their textbook curriculum, which anyone can use. It touches on everything from Git and agile workflows to Ruby, Rails, databases, JavaScript, and Backbone.js.

5. Prep Course for North American University’s Chapter of Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Competition (82 stars)

This repository is an 11-week prep course for programming competitions, but it can be used to practice algorithm challenges for interviews or improve algorithmic thinking. Prior programming knowledge and familiarity with data structures will help students who want to get started with this advanced course.

Top courses based on forks

1. Stanford TensorFlow Tutorials (2,452 forks)

These tutorials go along with Stanford’s TensorFlow for Deep Learning Research course. The syllabus, slides, and lecture notes are all available on the website, and each week’s assignments and examples are available in this repository.

2. Deep Learning Specialization on Coursera (1,133 forks)

This student-created repository includes all work from Coursera’s Deep Learning Specialization programming assignments. While this repository itself is not a curriculum, it’s a helpful guide for self-teaching and reading more about the concepts and solutions from this deep learning series of courses.

3. Creative Applications of Deep Learning with Tensorflow (591 forks)

This repository is comprised of assignments and lecture transcripts for Kadenze Academy’s Creative Applications of Deep Learning with TensorFlow curriculum. There are a total of five courses, and the repository also contains extensive documentation on setup and getting started with the tools students will need.

4. Practical RL: A course in reinforcement learning in the wild (401 forks)

This course is taught on-campus in Russian at the Higher School of Economics, but its online version is available to both English and Russian speakers. The entire course is nine weeks long, and the repository also contains bonus materials for students to explore after completing the curriculum.

5. Data Science Coursera (152 forks)

Michael Galarnyk, a Data Science M.A. student, decided to document his journey through Johns Hopkins’ Coursera Data Science curriculum as a supplement to his program at UC San Diego. Along with a directory for each course and its assignments, there’s also a link to a blog post reviewing each course week-by-week, so prospective students can get an idea of what to expect each week.

Find more course materials in the Education Community

For teachers who want to explore more courses, we posted a more extensive list in the GitHub Education Community. You’ll find tips, tricks, and scripts from teachers around the world who are passionate about computer science education.

Go to the Education Community site

Removing support for anonymous gist creation

As mentioned in our deprecation notice post, we’ve deprecated anonymous gist creation as of today, March 20.

All existing anonymous gists will always remain accessible, and it’s easy to create a GitHub account to make the most of a new gist. Check out the documentation to learn more.

Save the date: GitHub Universe 2018

GitHub Universe 2018, October 16-17

GitHub Universe, our flagship product and community conference, is returning this year to a new location. Join us October 16-17 at the Palace of Fine Arts for more sessions, more demonstrations, and more chances to meet with the best developer community in the known universe. Secure your spot with an early bird ticket or submit a speaker proposal if you’d like to lead a session.

Pick up an early bird ticket

Early bird tickets are available now for $99. Super early bird pricing will be available until April 20, but don’t wait—tickets will sell out.

Get early bird tickets

Submit a speaker proposal

Want to share your story at Universe? We’re calling for speakers to share ideas about the tools, people, and businesses behind software during Universe breakout sessions.

Submit a proposal

Teachers from Tufts, Duke and Loyola Marymount show their GitHub workflows at SIGCSE 2018

Nearly every conversation the GitHub Education team had with teachers at SIGCSE 2018 (Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education) touched on the themes of communication, iteration, and real-world tools. This year at SIGCSE we had two special sessions on those themes: three teachers walked through their GitHub workflows, and four students shared their experiences outside the classroom.

Teacher panel: Real-world tools, engaged students

Git has a learning curve for students (and teachers)! In this series of talks, teachers shared why they choose to use Git and GitHub and how it benefits their classroom.

Or skip to a specific section:

Check out teacher slides

Student panel: Outside the classroom

Hear students speak about using GitHub and the benefits of GitHub Education on their campuses.

Or skip to a specific section:

Check out student slides

Sign up for lesson plans, tutorials, and best practices from GitHub Education

Once a month we’ll pass along tips and tricks for implementing Git and GitHub in your classroom.

Subscribe for updates

EU wants to require platforms to filter uploaded content (including code)

$ git push 
remote: Resolving deltas: 100% (2/2), completed with 2 local objects.
remote: error: GH013: Your push could infringe someone's copyright.
remote: If you believe this is a false positive (e.g., it's yours, open
remote: source, not copyrightable, subject to exceptions) contact us:
remote: We're sorry for interrupting your work, but automated copyright
remote: filters are mandated by the EU's Article 13.
 ! [remote rejected] patch-1 -> patch-1 (push declined due to article 13 filters)

The EU is considering a copyright proposal that would require code-sharing platforms to monitor all content that users upload for potential copyright infringement (see the EU Commission’s proposed Article 13 of the Copyright Directive). The proposal is aimed at music and videos on streaming platforms, based on a theory of a “value gap” between the profits those platforms make from uploaded works and what copyright holders of some uploaded works receive. However, the way it’s written captures many other types of content, including code.

We’d like to make sure developers in the EU who understand that automated filtering of code would make software less reliable and more expensive—and can explain this to EU policymakers—participate in the conversation.

Why you should care about upload filters

Upload filters (“censorship machines”) are one of the most controversial elements of the copyright proposal, raising a number of concerns, including:

  • Privacy: Upload filters are a form of surveillance, effectively a “general monitoring obligation” prohibited by EU law
  • Free speech: Requiring platforms to monitor content contradicts intermediary liability protections in EU law and creates incentives to remove content
  • Ineffectiveness: Content detection tools are flawed (generate false positives, don’t fit all kinds of content) and overly burdensome, especially for small and medium-sized businesses that might not be able to afford them or the resulting litigation

Upload filters are especially concerning for software developers given that:

  • Software developers create copyrightable works—their code—and those who choose an open source license want to allow that code to be shared
  • False positives (and negatives) are especially likely for software code because code often has many contributors and layers, often with different licensing for different components
  • Requiring code-hosting platforms to scan and automatically remove content could drastically impact software developers when their dependencies are removed due to false positives

The EU Parliament continues to introduce new proposals for Article 13 but these issues remain. MEP Julia Reda explains further in a recent proposal from Parliament.

EU policymakers want and need to hear from developers

As part of our ongoing collaboration with others affected, GitHub will help represent developers at an upcoming breakfast in Parliament on Tuesday, March 20, intended to show the human impact of this copyright proposal.

EU policymakers have told us it would be very useful to hear directly from more developers. In particular, developers at European companies can make a significant impact.

How to reach EU policymakers

  1. Write to EU policymakers (MEPs, Council Members, or Commissioners) and ask them to exclude “software repositories” from Article 13. Please explain how important the ability to freely share code is for software developers and how important open source software is to the software industry and the EU economy

  2. Explain this :point_up: in person to EU policymakers

GitHub can help connect you with policymakers, provide additional background, or chat if you might be interested in representing software developers in defending your ability to share code and not have your builds break. Get in touch!


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